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Coordinating Conjunctions and Correlative Conjunctions

A conjunction joins words or groups of words in a sentence.

  • I ate lunch with Kate and Derma.
  • Because it is rainy today, the trip is canceled.
  • She didn’t press the bell, but I did.
There are three types of conjunctions:

1. Coordinating Conjunctions
     a. Connect words, phrases, or clauses that are independent or equal
     b. and, but, or, so, for, yet, and not

2. Correlative Conjunctions
     a. Used in pairs
     b. both/and, either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also

3. Subordinating Conjunctions
     a. Used at the beginning of subordinate clauses
     b. although, after, before, because, how, if, once, since, so that, until, unless, when, while, where, whether, etc.

Coordinating Conjunctions

1. And—means "in addition to":

  • We are going to a zoo and an aquarium on the same day.
2. But—connects two different things that are not in agreement:

  • I am a night owl, but she is an early bird.
3. Or—indicates a choice between two things:

  • Do you want a red one or a blue one?
4. So—illustrates a result of the first thing:

  • This song has been very popular, so I downloaded it.
5. For—means "because":

  • I want to go there again, for it was a wonderful trip.
6. Yet—indicates contrast with something:

  • He performed very well, yet he didn’t make the final cut.

Correlative Conjunctions

1. Both/and

  • She won gold medals from both the single and group races.
  • Both TV and television are correct words.
2. Either/or

  • I am fine with either Monday or Wednesday.
  • You can have either apples or pears.
3. Neither/nor

  • He enjoys neither drinking nor gambling.
  • Neither you nor I will get off early today.
4. Not only/but also

  • Not only red but also green looks good on you.
  • She got the perfect score in not only English but also math.

[Quiz 25.1]

Write the correct conjunction in each sentence.

1)                      my friend                      I are taking the geography class.
2) Do you want to go swimming                      golfing?
3) I studied grammar for a long time,                      I still make mistakes.
4)                      wood                      bricks can be used as homebuilding materials.
5) I wasn’t feeling well this morning,                      I had to go to work.

View Answers


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