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Get Out of Here

Meaning/Usage: Common way to express disbelief

Explanation: You are not telling someone to literally get out.  This is a common idiomatic phrase to express disbelief.  Often times it is used in a positive way as in the first example sentence below.

"Get out of here!  We actually finished in first place?"
"Get out of here.  She would never say such a thing about me."
"Get out of here.  That's hard to believe."

A.  "Jen told me that Ryan got an A on his test."
B.  "Get out of here!  He didn't even study!"
A.  "I'm telling you the truth, he got an A."
B.  "What a surprise."

Other Common Sentences

"Are you joking with me?"
"Are you serious?"


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