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Sentence Patterns using "What is the point of...?"

This question is asking for the reason, purpose, worth, or usefulness of something.

We can use this to ask a serious question when we are truly curious about the reason, purpose, or worth of something. We usually ask a question like this when we do not understand something and we want to know why.
  • I am curious. What is the point of doing this?
  • What is the point of writing it like this?
  • What's the point of life?
We can also use this as a rhetorical question. This means that the question does not require an answer. We usually do this when we are angry, annoyed, or sad and we think that something is useless, pointless, or worthless.
  • What is the point of working overtime today? It is so unnecessary!
  • What is the point of dating? I love being single.
  • What's the point of life?
What is the point of + noun/gerund...?
  • What is the point of studying English?
  • What is the point of this?
  • What is the point of homework?
  • What is the point of filling out this paperwork?
  • What is the point of life?
  • What is the point of working so hard?
  • What is the point of exploring space?
  • What is the point of spending so much on weapons?
We can also use this question when talking directly to another person or asking about a third person. It has the same meaning as the question above.

What do you think is the point of + noun/gerund...?
  • What do you think is the point of tomorrow's meeting?
  • What do you think is the point of this?
  • What does he think is the point of sharing notes with coworkers?
  • What does she think is the point of marriage?
  • What do you think is the point of this drill?
Bonus Tips and Points

1. We can use the word "point" in a few different ways.

We can use it as a verb to mean put your finger in some direction.
  • Point to the door.
  • Point to where it hurts.
  • Can you point to the person in this picture who stole the watch?
We can use "point" as a noun that means an idea that you try to get other people to accept. We use it this way a lot when debating or discussing an issue. "Point" can be changed to "what you said" in these sentences.
  • That is a good point.
  • I don't understand your point.
  • He made an interesting point.
  • Your point doesn't make sense.
  • Can you understand my point?
Similarly, we can also use the noun "point" to talk about details or arguments.
  • I have 2 points to make.
  • We have many points to talk about in this meeting.
Real-World English Conversations

A) My son asked what the point of math is.
B) What did you tell him?
A) I told him that math helps him become smarter and teaches him to think logically. So, math is important even if he gets a job that doesn't require math.

A) What is the point of life?
B) People have been asking that question since the beginning of time. I think each person has to find their own answer.

A) What is the point of this work?
B) To be honest, I don't think there is a point to this work. I think they are just trying to keep us busy.

A) What is the point of a reference number?
B) We include the reference number so that we can find something easily.
A) I see.

Use these free English lessons to learn the most common sentence patterns in the English language. If you learn these sentences and questions, it will help you speak English well. Study the lessons thoroughly, practice making your own sentences, and come back to review often. If you do these three steps, your English speaking will improve quickly and you will be able to have natural English conversations.

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